Turn 2D Video Into 3D Easy and Fast | MIT & Qatar Reasearch

2D Video – 3D Video

The researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Qatar Computing Research Institute have developed a unique system by using a software that does the job of powering the video games. The new system that has been created can turn the 2D video of a soccer game in 3D.

The converted video can be played on any device that supports 3D videos- a commercial 3D TV, the new cardboard system by Google which somehow turns the smartphones into 3D displays or maybe, special purpose displays such as Oculus Rift.

“Any TV these days is capable of 3D. There’s just no content. So, we see that the production of high-quality content is the main thing that should happen,” says Wojciech Matusik, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT.

In the present times, the video games which are being played are generally known to store a very precise and detailed 3D map of the whole environment which the player is navigating. When the player decides to initiate a move, the map is adjusted automatically by the game itself according to the move and on fly; it generates a 2D projection of the 3D sequence that somehow corresponds to a particular viewing angle.

The MIT and QCRI researchers essentially ran the whole process in reverse to test and they managed to get some great results out of that and had some pretty much convincing 3D effects. The authors further added that no visual artifacts were used in the process.

A few years back, the researchers have also tried to create a general purpose system in order to effectively convert 2D video to 3D, but they failed.

“Our advantage is that we can develop it for a very specific problem domain,” Matusik added.

“We are developing a conversion pipeline for a specific sport. We would like to do it at broadcast quality, and we would like to do it in real-time. What we have noticed is that we can leverage video games,” he explained.

The researchers showcased the recently developed system at the Association for Computing Machinery’s Multimedia conference in Brisbane, Australia, last week.

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